The Neurologist and the 4 Components of Functional Eating

What do the two have to do with each other?  Absolutely nothing.  It just describes my day.  Or perhaps a secret 8th Harry Potter book.  You decide.

I went over this afternoon to see the neurologist for a consult.  It was supposed to be for sleep apnea, common for us non-wee folk.   But it also became a consult for my migraines.  I bought my very first house in July of 2015.  bout 3 weeks later, I fell down the second floor stairs, and hit every damn step on the way down.  I was buck naked and holding an empty laundry basket at 6:30 in the morning.  When I hit the bottom, I thought I had broken my hip.   I decided that if I could put weight on it, it wasn’t broken.  I limped around the kitchen – not broken.  I had to go to work, so I hopped in the shower.  A burning went up my arm – it turns out I had a second degree burn on my forearm from the carpet.  I got to work and my eyes started going in different directions.  I left work after a few hours, spent the rest of the day in the Emergency department, and have had migraines since, including one Thursday that brought for the first time nausea and vertigo.  That scared me a little.  That was not my first concussion.  Far from it.  I am not a pro football player, but I was a boy, and I am now a man, and I find myself sometimes in situations that result in concussions.  Don’t ask.  And if you haven’t seen the Will Smith movie Concussion, see it.  Great movie.  Not really about football at all.

Anyway, the neurologist gave me the choice of what to treat first.  I decided to treat the sleep apnea.  My reasoning was that I have to sleep every night, and I do not have migraines every day.  Also, there is a chance that by taking care of the sleep apnea, it may take care of the migraines.  The reverse is not true, and could also result in more kids for me, the side effects of which did not seem particularly pleasant.  So the medical group will submit to the insurance company for preauthorization, and we’ll see if I can do the in-lab test because it’s more comprehensive and I want this taken care of.  I rushed back to work for three meetings, then got back in the car and went back to Portsmouth, literally across the street from the neurologist’s office, for the behavioral psychology sessions required through the bariatric program.

Tonight we discussed the 4 components of functional eating patterns:

  1. Portion regulation – have a strategy
  2. Food selection – read the labels!
  3. Interval eating – eat by the clock, anywhere from every 2 to 5 hours. Meal, snack, meal, snack, etc.
  4. Compensation – if you overdo it on food and possibly stretch your pouch, then its time to increase your exercise, reduce your calorie intake, or both.

Good stuff.  Next week we’re supposed to bring at least one of the people in our post-surgical support them with us to class.  I will be attending alone.  I have support, but they will only be here if I call them.  I kind of prefer it that way.  Perhaps I’ll feel differently when the time comes.  My family are the type that are always offering to jump in and help.  I love that about them.  There are a few others, a few people at work, and a few people outside of work, but they have their own lives.

Do any of you have any thoughts about this?  I’d love to hear them.  By the way, dear reader, if you are considering bariatric surgery, I strongly urge you to subscribe to two blogs I absolutely love: rny4me just had gastric bypass surgery and chronicles it warts and all, and banded carolina girl offers a fresh perspective and encouragement.  I’ve drawn a lot of strength from those two, and I likely have not told them in any way, shape, or form, but thank you.  You are keeping me on the path.

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